Too Stressed For Exercise? Cultivate Vitality With Standing Meditation

Let’s face it. Life brings challenges into our lives every day. With these challenges comes stress and with stress comes mental and physical fatigue. If you are feeling stressed to the point that you have lost your desire for exercise, your vitality is most likely very low.

If you fall into this category, now may be a perfect time to cultivate vitality through stillness. It is time to learn a smarter, not harder method of increasing your energy and vitality levels. This article will show you how to take the necessary steps needed to decrease your stress levels through meditation.

Meditation may help you get back to performing those exercises and routines you just cannot seem to motivate yourself to do right now.

Standing meditation – become strong by doing “nothing”

Have you ever heard of the saying, “Become as strong as an oak tree by doing nothing?” This statement may sound silly, crazy even. However, there is truth to it.

Sometimes, doing nothing will cultivate vitality. One of the best energizing exercises to accomplish this is standing meditation. This is a very simple exercise to perform, does not require equipment, and can be performed anywhere. You only need your body and a little patience.

Free yourself from distractions

First, find an area that is peaceful and free from distractions. The environment around you should be void of phones ringing, kids yelling, jackhammers drilling, iPhones chiming, etc. For added effect, you may dim the lights.

Stand with good posture

  1. Your feet should be about hip width apart and parallel to each other, knees slightly bent, and your spine lengthened to comfortably make yourself as tall as possible.
  2. To achieve this position, gently pull your belly button toward your spine, tuck your chin in slightly, and relax your shoulders and arms.
  3. Try not to have your shoulders drop forward. With the correct position, your ear, shoulder, hip joint, knee, and ankle should all line up when viewed from the side. You want to be balanced on your feet.
  4. Relax your tongue and have it rest on the roof of your mouth just behind the front teeth.

Meditate

You are now in the best position to allow optimal flow of life force energy, known as Chi or Prana, and are ready to perform the standing meditation exercise.

  1. Let your arms hang completely relaxed by your sides.
  2. Gently close your eyes. Keep your eyes closed for the duration of the exercise.
  3. Pretend you are holding a soap bubble (also known as a Chi bubble) about the size of a basketball right in front of your lower abdomen/pelvis region. Feel and imagine the bubble being half in and half out of your body.
  4. Change the size and location of the Chi bubble by slowly moving it up and down the body to wherever you would like, always remembering to keep half of the bubble in your body.
  5. As you hold the bubble and move it up and down, work your hands around it as if you are turning it around in your hands.
  6. Pay careful attention to how your body feels. You may feel:
    • A magnetism or repelling sensation between your hands.
    • A tingling in your limbs.
    • A sudden increase of heat in your hands or limbs.
    • Something completely different and unique.
    • Nothing at all.

Don’t worry about not feeling the “right thing.” Everyone experiences meditation differently and all of the above feelings are 100% normal.

Remember to breathe

  1. Remember to breathe while your meditate.
  2. Breathe in through your nose and out through your nose or mouth. Breathing should be deep, very slow, rhythmic and relaxed, never forced.
  3. Expand your belly as you inhale. This allows your diaphragm to drop down and pull air into your lower lungs.
  4. Exhale completely through your nose or mouth, contracting your belly as you do so.
  5. Slowly repeat.

Practice mindfulness and awareness

As you are doing nothing, it is natural for your mind to wander. You may start thinking about the stressors of your day and of your life.

Try to be an observer, as if you were watching yourself from a distance. Each time your mind wanders from this opportunity to be quiet, do nothing but try to bring it back to that quiet place.

Some people with a “jumpy mind” find it helpful to count their breaths as they meditate. This will give you something to focus on that is not stressful, and soon you may feel yourself getting lighter, having deeper and more relaxed breathing, and feeling more energized.

Sitting is okay

If your body grows tired of standing, you can continue the meditation exercise while sitting. If you do this, try to remain aligned as before. When you feel rested, stand and continue.

How long? Increase the duration as you get stronger

Start with just five to ten minutes a day.  Try to work yourself up to thirty minutes a day of doing nothing. An hour is even better.

What to expect

Some changes people may experience after repetitive sessions of standing meditation include:

  • Improved sense of awareness
  • Increased self confidence
  • Improved athletic ability
  • Increased energy and vitality levels
  • Disappearance of chronic ailments
  • Tighter, more youthful looking skin
  • An increased ability to sense others thoughts and feelings

Conclusion

Good luck and remember, to fuel and improve our minds and bodies, we do not always have to be moving. Sometimes the missing element in our days and lives is peace and quiet.

Remind yourself each day the importance of slowing down so that you can build a strong mind-body connection. This, along with a healthy diet, will enable you to put forth the energy needed to do the activities you love.

If you do not allow yourself to slow down in life, you risk harming your mind and body which may ultimately prevent you from achieving the vitality, optimal health and happiness you deserve.

Thoughts?

  • Do you believe meditation is an important exercise to practice? Why or why not?
  • If you meditate, how do you make time for meditation?
  • What are some challenges you face when it comes to meditation?
  • Has meditation improved your life? If so, how?

Please share your feedback in the comment section below this post. I look forward to hearing from you!

Photo credits

  1. internalarttripod.com

 

Author Details
Founder and CEO of BambooCore
Jennifer is a certified NASM Personal Trainer, MovNat Trainer, and a C.H.E.K Holistic Lifestyle/Nutrition Coach. As the Founder and CEO of BambooCore Fitness, she delivers sustainable lifestyle, nutrition and movement strategies to people looking to improve their health and performance.

When she is not slaying fat and building muscle, Jennifer can be found trekking barefoot, traveling, cooking and refining her photography skills. She also enjoys reading and writing about food culture, history and the science of human movement.
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Founder and CEO of BambooCore
Jennifer is a certified NASM Personal Trainer, MovNat Trainer, and a C.H.E.K Holistic Lifestyle/Nutrition Coach. As the Founder and CEO of BambooCore Fitness, she delivers sustainable lifestyle, nutrition and movement strategies to people looking to improve their health and performance.

When she is not slaying fat and building muscle, Jennifer can be found trekking barefoot, traveling, cooking and refining her photography skills. She also enjoys reading and writing about food culture, history and the science of human movement.

Comments

  1. I love the idea of meditating but have trouble with distraction. I start to think about all sorts of things. My challenge is to free my mind and clear my head for 10 minutes. Oh, to be completely peaceful…

    1. Ah, yes…this is completely normal! I suggest that you start with a shorter time goal. Try to free your mind for just a couple minutes. Practice this over and over, day after day, constantly training your brain to acknowledge and embrace your wandering thoughts, but then training the brain to let them go. With consistent mindful practice, this will become easier and easier and before you know it, you will be able to keep your mind free of distraction for 10 or more minutes. Good luck!

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