Avoid the gray-green funk that comes with overcooked eggs and cook perfect hard-boiled eggs instead. To do so, just follow the ten steps listed in this simple recipe. It's easy and very rewarding.

How to Make Perfect Hard-Boiled Eggs

Hard-boiled eggs are versatile snacks for a Paleo lunch/snack box because they are nutritious and easy to cook. They make fantastic on-the-go high protein snacks and can be used in dishes such as deviled eggs, egg salad, appetizers and sandwiches.

A properly cooked hard-boiled egg is delicious but the same doesn’t hold true for an overcooked egg. I don’t know about you but I do not like the gray-green, funky sulfur discoloration that overcooked egg yolks display. (Fun fact: This ring is ferrous sulfide, a compound naturally formed when the iron from the yolk meets hydrogen sulfide released from the egg white by the heat – a reaction that takes place when the egg is cooked at too high of a temperature for too long.)

Avoid the gray-green funk that comes with overcooked eggs and cook perfect hard-boiled eggs instead. To do so, just follow the ten steps listed in this simple recipe. It’s easy and very rewarding.

Ingredients

  • 6 large organic eggs (eggs from free-range and grass-fed chickens are best)
  • Cold water
  • Ice

Equipment

Make perfect hard-boiled eggs in 10 steps

How to make perfect hard-boiled eggs

Instructions

How to cook hard boiled eggs

  1. Place eggs in saucepan. Make sure they are in a single layer.
  2. Cover eggs with 1-1.5 inches of cold water.
  3. Set pan over high heat and bring the water to a full, rolling boil.
  4. Once water starts to boil, turn off the heat.
  5. Cover pan with a lid. If you have an electric stovetop, remove the pan from the burner entirely.
  6. Set timer for 12 minutes. Leave eggs in the covered pan (in water) for this amount of time (with heat off).
  7. After 12 minutes, remove the cooked eggs from the pan with a slotted spoon.
  8. Tap and crack each eggshell gently a couple of times.
  9. Transfer eggs to bowl and completely submerge in ice water for 5 minutes.
  10. When ready to eat, peel eggs and enjoy.

Recipe notes

How to cook hard boiled eggs

  • Purchase organic eggs free of antibiotics and hormones. If possible, buy your eggs from a local farm and make sure the eggs are from free-range (cage-free/pasture-raised), grass-fed chickens.
  • To determine if your raw eggs are fresh, try one of the testing methods listed in this article, “Are Your Eggs Fresh?”
  • This recipe makes 6 eggs but you can make fewer or more.
  • For slightly runny, soft-boiled eggs, set timer for 4-5 minutes.
  • For firmer, soft-boiled eggs, set timer for 6-7 minutes.
  • For firm and creamy hard-boiled eggs, set timer for 10 minutes.
  • If you live at high altitude, let the eggs sit in the water longer.
  • Cooling the eggs in cold water after cooking makes the eggs contract slightly in the shell, making them easier to peel.
  • Older eggs are easier to peel than fresher eggs.
  • For storage, cover and refrigerate any unused eggs, still in their shells, within 2 hours. Store in the fridge for up to 5-7 days.

How to boil eggs

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Avoid the gray-green funk that comes with overcooked eggs and cook perfect hard-boiled eggs instead. To do so, just follow the ten steps listed in this simple recipe. It's easy and very rewarding.

How to Make the Perfect Hard Boiled Egg


  • Author: Jennifer Regan, Bamboo Core Fitness
  • Prep Time: 5 mins
  • Cook Time: 12 mins
  • Total Time: 17 mins

Ingredients

  • 6 large organic eggs
  • Cold water
  • Ice
  • Stove
  • Small saucepan without a non-stick surface
  • Saucepan lid
  • Timer
  • Slotted spoon
  • Bowl

Instructions

  1. Place eggs in saucepan. Make sure they are in a single layer.
  2. Cover eggs with 1-1.5 inches of cold water.
  3. Set pan over high heat and bring the water to a full, rolling boil.
  4. Once water starts to boil, turn off the heat.
  5. Cover pan with a lid. If you have an electric stovetop, remove the pan from the burner entirely.
  6. Set timer for 12 minutes. Leave eggs in the covered pan (in water) for this amount of time (with heat off).
  7. After 12 minutes, remove the cooked eggs from the pan with a slotted spoon.
  8. Tap and crack each eggshell gently a couple of times.
  9. Transfer eggs to bowl and completely submerge them in ice water for 5 minutes.
  10. When ready to eat, peel eggs and enjoy.

Notes

1. Purchase organic eggs free of antibiotics and hormones. If possible, purchase your eggs from a local farm and make sure the eggs are products of free-range (cage-free), grass-fed chickens.
2. This recipe makes 6 eggs but you can make fewer or more.
3. For slightly runny, soft-boiled eggs, set timer for 4-5 minutes.
4. For firmer, soft-boiled eggs, set timer for 6-7 minutes.
5. For firm and creamy hard-boiled eggs, set timer for 10 minutes.
6. If you live at high altitude, let the eggs sit in the water longer.
7. Cooling the eggs in cold water after cooking makes the eggs contract slightly in the shell, making them easier to peel.
8. Older eggs are easier to peel than fresher eggs.
9. For storage, cover and refrigerate any unused eggs, still in their shells, within 2 hours. Store in the fridge for up to 5-7 days.

 

 

Author Details
Founder and CEO of BambooCore
Jennifer is a certified NASM Personal Trainer, MovNat Trainer, and a C.H.E.K Holistic Lifestyle/Nutrition Coach. As the Founder and CEO of BambooCore Fitness, she delivers sustainable lifestyle, nutrition and movement strategies to people looking to improve their health and performance.

When she is not slaying fat and building muscle, Jennifer can be found trekking barefoot, traveling, cooking and refining her photography skills. She also enjoys reading and writing about food culture, history and the science of human movement.
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Founder and CEO of BambooCore
Jennifer is a certified NASM Personal Trainer, MovNat Trainer, and a C.H.E.K Holistic Lifestyle/Nutrition Coach. As the Founder and CEO of BambooCore Fitness, she delivers sustainable lifestyle, nutrition and movement strategies to people looking to improve their health and performance.

When she is not slaying fat and building muscle, Jennifer can be found trekking barefoot, traveling, cooking and refining her photography skills. She also enjoys reading and writing about food culture, history and the science of human movement.

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